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Cardigan Welsh Corgi

corgi

 

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Description

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a long, low to the ground dog. Their backs are actually not longer than most dogs’, their legs are just very short in comparison. The topline is level. The head is in good proportion to the rest of the dog. The broad, flat skull is rounded and tapered. The muzzle is parallel with the skull and has a moderate stop. The nose is black in all colors but may be butterfly in merle-colored dogs. The teeth meet in a scissors bite. The wide-set eyes are medium to large in size with dark rims. The oval eyes are shades of brown depending on the dog’s coat color. Dogs with a blue merle coat may have blue eyes, either both eyes, or one of each. The eye rims are black. The erect ears are large in proportion with the rest of the dog, moderately large at the base and slightly rounded at the tips. The chest is deep with a prominent breastbone. The legs are very short. The tail is low-set and long. Dewclaws are usually removed. The round paws are relatively large and the front feet turn out slightly. The double coat has a short, thick, weather resistant undercoat with a longer, coarser outer coat. The coat is longer at the ruff, back of the legs and on the underside of the tail. Some Corgis are born with longer coats called the “fluffy Corgi” or “long-haired Corgi.” These dogs do not make the written standard and cannot be shown. Coat colors include red, sable, fawn, brindle, black and brindle, blue merle (black and gray; marbled), black and tan with or without white markings. There are often white markings on the legs, chest, neck and parts of the muzzle.

The most obvious difference between the Pembroke Welsh Corgi and the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is that the Pembroke lacks a tail while the Cardigan has a long tail. The Pembroke usually has straighter legs, as it is not quite as long- bodied as a Cardigan; the Pembroke’s head is generally more wedge-shaped; the ears are smaller and closer together than the Cardigans; also the Pembroke tends to be lighter than the Cardigan.

Temperament

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is highly intelligent and obedient, able and willing to please its owner. Reliable, dedicated and loving, but can be wary of strangers. Socialize well, preferably when young. Corgis are extremely active and devoted little dogs, and are good with considerate children so long as the dog sees himself below humans in the pack order. Protective and sturdy, they make fine guards, and excellent show and obedience dogs. Good with other non-canine animals, but can be combative with other dogs if the owners do not properly communicate to the dog that aggressiveness is an unwanted behavior. They sometimes attempt to herd people by nipping at their heels, and should be taught not to do this. The Pembroke tends to bark a lot and makes a good watchdog. If you find your dog is barking at you in order to communicate, you need to hush the dog and look into your leadership skills. A dog that is barking at you in that manner is showing signs of dominancy issues.If you can treat your Corgi in such a way that he is mentally sound, he makes a wonderful companion. Issues will arise if the dog is above the humans in the pack order and if he does not receive enough daily exercise. Do not allow the Corgi to developed Small Dog Syndrome.

Height, weight  Height: Males 10 – 13 inches (25 – 33 cm) Females 10 – 13 inches (25 – 33 cm)  Weight: Males 25 – 30 pounds (11 – 14 kg) Females 25 – 30 pounds (11 – 14 kg)

Corgifamily[1]

Health Problems

Prone to PRA, glaucoma and back disorders. Gains weight easily. Do not overfeed for if they become fat it can cause back problems.

Living Conditions

Corgis will do fine in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. With enough exercise they can be calm indoors, but will be very active if they are lacking. Will do okay without a yard so long as they are taken for daily walks.

Exercise

Even more active that the Pembroke; Cardigans must have regular exercise, including a daily, long walk. While out on the walk the dog must be made to heel beside or behind the person holding the lead, as in a dog’s mind the leader leads the way, and that leader needs to be the human.

Life Expectancy  About 12-15 years.

Grooming

The wiry, medium-length water-resistant coat is easy to groom. Comb and brush with a firm bristle brush, and bathe only when necessary. The coat is shed two times per year.

Origin

The Cardigan Welsh Corgi is older than the Pembroke Welsh Corgi, with the Pembroke being bred out of the Cardigan. Both Corgi varieties may be a descendant of the Keeshond, Pomeranian, Schipperkes and the Swedish Vallhund. Some say the older Cardigan was from Cardiganshire, brought there by the Celts in 1200 BC, whereas the Pembroke’s ancestors were introduced by Flemish weavers to the Celts in the 1100s. Whatever the case may be, the Cardigan and the Pembroke Welsh Corgis were interbred and considered the same breed up until 1934 when a show judge thought they were too different and separated them into two different breeds. After they were separated the Pembroke gained in popularity and is to this day more popular than the Cardigan. The name “corgi” is specific to that type of dog breed in Cymreig (Welsh). Dog in Cymreig (Welsh) is ‘Ci’ or if it is softly mutated ‘Gi,’ hence Corgi. The Pembroke was actually recognized by the AKC a year before the Cardigan. The Cardigan was recognized in 1935 and the Pembroke in 1934. Corgis were used as cattle drivers, vermin hunters and farm guards. They drove cattle by barking and nipping at the cattle’s heels rather than just herding them. The dog’s low stature helped him roll out of the way of kicking cows.

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Cardigan Welsh Corgi

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